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Research Enterprise Newsletter

The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research (OVCR) publishes the RESEARCH ENTERPRISE to keep the academic community and the community at large informed about research activities, opportunities and development on the IUPUI campus.

Research Offices:
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Enterprise Archive


Editor:
Etta Ward

Layout:
Fred Haver


If you have a news item or recent noteworthy research-related achievement that you would like to share, please see the Research Enterprise Submission Guidelines.

Please be aware that not all news items will be deemed appropriate or timely for publication, but each item will be carefully considered.

October 16, 2014

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

FEATURE STORY

School of Science biophysicist receives a $470,350 NSF award

Steve Pressé, Ph.D.

Steve Pressé, Ph.D.

A $470,350 award from the National Science Foundation will support research at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to gain a better understanding of how proteins form groups or clusters within cells in the living body. Abnormal protein grouping is known to be associated with cancer and with heart arrhythmias, but scant knowledge exists about how proteins group.

"We will be conducting the first truly systematic investigation into how proteins assemble to determine the group makeup as well as the processes by which they assemble," said biophysicist Steve Pressé, assistant professor of physics in the School of Science, the principal investigator of the NSF grant. "Our goal is to gain an understanding of what is normal so we can also learn what is not normal. Ultimately, preventing or correcting abnormal grouping will require knowledge of both."

Proteins are complex molecules that do much of the cell's work and are required for the structure, function and regulation of the body’s tissues and organs. They are difficult to visualize, even with modern imaging techniques. Because of their small size, super-resolution methods involving the tagging of proteins with special florescent dyes are used to study proteins. These dyes behave like tiny light bulbs that allow scientists to precisely locate the tagged protein in live cells. However, the tagged proteins may be packed so tightly in a group that all the light bulbs may be crammed within space the size of a single pixel on a super-resolution image.

» Read more...

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Voida receives Google Faculty Research Award for wearable display ecologies project

Stephen Voida, Ph.D.

Stephen Voida, Ph.D.

Stephen Voida, assistant professor of human-computer interaction at the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, has received the prestigious Google Faculty Research Award.

The Google Faculty Research Award is accompanied by a $55,673 grant that will support the study “Glanceable, Peripheral, Haptic, and Audible Displays: Supporting Wearable Display Ecologies for Personal Informatics." This study will help to expand scientists’ and designers’ understanding of how users manage information across multiple devices and test a new infrastructure for coordinating information displays across a wide variety of computing devices, including smartphones, tablets, augmented reality systems like Google Glass, and wearable computing devices like the Apple Watch, FitBit, Samsung Galaxy Gear and Moto 360 smartwatch.

“Today people have multiple devices that they use to communicate, work and organize their lives -- a smartphone, tablet, watch, audio player -- and the list continues to grow," Voida said. "It can be overwhelming trying to keep everything updated and in sync. Our research aims to enable a person’s devices to communicate with one another to display alerts and notifications on the right device and at the right time.

“We envision that this research will have a significant impact on the daily lives of people who use multiple devices by helping to reduce the amount of work that managing these devices often requires … and the potential annoyance of having to deal with a constant stream of notifications,” Voida said.

School of Science researchers receive $200,000 grant to research fetal alcohol spectrum disorder

Jim Marrs, Ph.D.

Jim Marrs, Ph.D.

Researchers from the School of Science hope to increase awareness of the risks of drinking alcohol while pregnant.

Jim Marrs, associate professor of biology, has spent the past decade researching fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. His lab, which includes six undergraduate student researchers, conducts research to determine what stages of embryonic development are most sensitive to ethanol (alcohol) and which organs are most affected during these developmental windows.

Marrs uses zebrafish to model fetal alcohol syndrome and study how ethanol interferes with normal development. The embryos can be tested for effects of exposure from very early development, mimicking exposure in a woman’s first trimester of pregnancy.

“The earliest stages of development are the most sensitive to environmental toxins,” Marrs said. “Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are the most prevalent, preventable birth defects. The rates of this disease haven’t changed, despite increasing awareness. There still needs to be more awareness and more research to understand the consequences.”

The U.S. Surgeon General advises pregnant women and women who are considering becoming pregnant to abstain from alcohol consumption to eliminate alcohol-exposed pregnancies; yet it is estimated that 40,000 babies are born each year with FASDs, which describe a range of effects that can happen to a fetus when a woman drinks alcohol during her pregnancy.

Alcohol in the mother’s blood passes to the baby through the placenta and the umbilical cord. There is no known safe amount or type of alcohol to drink during pregnancy. FASDs can impact children’s physical, mental, behavioral or cognitive development. The most recognized condition along the continuum of FASDs, fetal alcohol syndrome, is characterized by growth deficiencies, central nervous system disabilities and specific facial characteristics, and is the most preventable form of intellectual disability. The number of children born with fetal alcohol syndrome alone is comparable to spina bifida or Down syndrome.

This summer, Marrs was awarded a $217,274 grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism to conduct further research on congenital heart defects resulting from fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Marrs will work with research associate Swapnalee Sarmah, on the two-year project.

Marrs’ research was initially funded as a pilot project by the Indiana Alcohol Research Center, on the IUPUI campus. The center, established in 1987, continues to be source of consultation and collaboration for Marrs.

Marrs hopes his continued research will help bring a better understanding to the effects of FASDs so it can lead to wider awareness, better therapy for adults or future regenerative medicine for the innocent victims of these disorders.

To prevent FASDs, a woman should not drink alcohol while she is pregnant or if she might be pregnant. In the United States, nearly half of all pregnancies are unplanned. If a woman is drinking alcohol during pregnancy, it is never too late to stop. Because brain growth takes place throughout pregnancy, the sooner a woman stops drinking the safer it will be for her and her baby.

2014 IUPUI Innovation Forum and Showcase: Alternatives for Funding New Ventures - SAVE THE DATE!

Target Audience: Faculty
When: Thursday, November 20, 2014 | 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Where: Campus Center Theater

The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and the Indiana University Research & Technology Corporation (IURTC) cosponsor the IUPUI Innovation Forum and Showcase. There are more funding options open to startups than ever before as new services have emerged to fill the gap created as banks and conventional venture capital firms pull away from riskier early stage investments. An expert panel will provide insights on how new firms can explore options for raising funds, even in the earliest stages—while the company is still small, and even when the company does not yet have a marketable product.

Register at https://crm.iu.edu/CRMEvents/InnovationForum2014/.

For more information or if you have questions, contact Karen White at274-1083 or kfwhite@iupui.edu.

IUPUI Nanotechnology Research Forum and Poster Symposium - October 24

Ian Steff

Ian Steff
State of Indiana's Senior Advisor for Nanotechnology and Advanced Manufacturing

Target Audience: Academic and industrial investigators including students interested in nanotechnology and its applications
When: Friday, October 24, 2014 | 12:30pm - 4:00pm
Where: University Library, Lilly Auditorium

This symposium brings together investigators from diverse scientific disciplines with nanotechnology expertise to present and explore potential collaborative research opportunities (see Symposium Flyer). The event will include a keynote address by Ian Steff who serves as the State of Indiana’s Senior Advisor for Nanotechnology and Advanced Manufacturing. He oversees strategies to further develop the nanotechnology industry and related advanced manufacturing initiatives. During his career, Steff led initiatives that promoted market growth on behalf of American chip designers and manufacturers. He also supported successful technology partnerships between industry, government, and universities to ensure U.S. competitiveness in the nanotechnology era. A poster session will follow enabling attendees to interact with several investigators who develop or utilize nanotechnology in their research. Learn more about the Integrated Nanosystems Development Institute.

Register: https://crm.iu.edu/CRMEvents/NanotechnologySymposium2014/

New release of Federal RePORTER now online

Federal RePORTER contains detailed, searchable data on federally funded science projects, grants, and awards. The new release greatly expands the number of agencies in Federal RePORTER. Additions include:

US Department of Agriculture research agencies:
-Agricultural Research Service (ARS)
-National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA)
-US Forest Service

Health and Human Services operating units:
-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
-Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
-Administration for Children and Families (ACF)
-Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)

Department of Defense programs:
-Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM)
-Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP)

Department of Veterans Affairs research:
-Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

These additional agencies are searchable alongside those that made their information available previously in Federal RePORTER:
-National Institutes of Health (NIH)
-National Science Foundation (NSF)
-Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
-National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

In addition to allowing users to search a wide swathe of Federal research simultaneously, Federal RePORTER features a number of tools for search, discovery, and visualization. These include a flexible search interface, charts, maps, and hierarchical topic groupings based on descriptive text about the project.

More information is available in a recent blog post by Sally Rockey, NIH Deputy Director for Extramural Research. The post can be found at http://nexus.od.nih.gov/all/2014/09/23/federal-reporter/.

 

CENTER SPOTLIGHT

$1 million raised in honor of IU physician scientist who cured testicular cancer on 40th anniversary of milestone

Lawrence Einhorn, M.D.

Lawrence Einhorn, M.D.

Gifts totaling $1 million in honor of the 40th anniversary of the cure for testicular cancer were announced Saturday at a celebration for the physician scientist who developed the treatment.

Family, friends, colleagues, and men grateful for their lives gathered the evening of Saturday, September 27th at the Indianapolis Museum of Art to honor Lawrence Einhorn, M.D., Indiana University Distinguished Professor and Livestrong Foundation Professor of Oncology at the IU School of Medicine and a researcher at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center.

It was in September 1974 when Dr. Einhorn tested the platinum-based drug Cisplatin with two additional drugs that were effective in killing testis cancer cells. The combination became the cure for this once deadly disease. There are now more than 300,000 survivors today because of Dr. Einhorn’s research.  

“When Dr. Einhorn began his work four decades ago, there was no term ‘cancer survivor’,” Patrick J Loehrer, M.D. director of the IU Simon Cancer Center, said. “Now thanks to his research and leadership, 95 percent of the most common cancer in young men is curable. Today, the IU Simon Cancer Center is uniquely positioned to develop a program of significant magnitude for all cancer survivors.”

» Read more...

 

FACULTY SPOTLIGHT

IU study links skipping school, failing tests to more sex, less condom use in teenage girls

Devon Hensel, Ph.D.

Devon Hensel, Ph.D.

What do skipping school, failing tests and engaging in risky sexual behavior have in common? Lots, according to Indiana University researchers who combed through 80,000 daily reports written by 14- to 17-year-old girls.

Although the findings are intuitive, this is the first study to examine the day-to-day relationship between teenage girls' reports about school-related events, how they felt and the sexual behaviors they participated in. Published Sept. 9 in the Journal of Adolescent Health, the findings are based on a 10-year study of the development of 387 teenage girls' romantic/sexual relationships and sexual behavior. During the study, the teens entered their daily activities and mood into a log.

"This study demonstrates that young women’s weekday reports of skipping school and failing a test were significantly linked to more frequent vaginal sex, less frequent condom use and different sexual emotions, on that same day," said lead author Devon J. Hensel, Ph.D., said.

Prior studies have shown that academic success is linked to lower sexual risk, but researchers have relied on retrospective information, she said.

“The strength of using multiple daily reports is that allows us a more ecologically valid, or ‘real world,’ look at how young women’s academic and romantic behaviors are linked from one day to the next. Rather than relying on reports about what happened in the past, we have a unique view of events as they unfold," said Dr. Hensel, who is an assistant research professor of pediatrics in the Section of Adolescent Medicine at the IU School of Medicine, and an assistant professor of sociology at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

» Read more...

 

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Center for Research and Learning Welcomes Inaugural Cohort of IPREP Fellows

2014 IPREP Fellows Ross Nelson, Sage Bates, Alan Tyson II and Michel Companion

2014 IPREP Fellows Ross Nelson, Sage Bates, Alan Tyson II and Michel Companion

The Center for Research and Learning (CRL) expanded its programming this fall with the launch of the IUPUI Post-baccalaureate Program (IPREP), funded by the National Institutes of Health. With the primary objective of improving the diversity of IUPUI graduate students and the professoriate in the United States in the biomedical and behavioral sciences, CRL will prepare four to six recent college graduates each year from underrepresented-minority populations, including students with disabilities, for admission to graduate programs in five areas of interest to the nation’s healthcare industry, i.e., biomedical engineering, clinical psychology, human performance and kinesiology, medical neuroscience and the psychobiology of addictions.

Each of the 2014 IPREP fellows—Sage Bates, Michel Companion, Ross Nelson and Alan Tyson II—will complete a full-time paid twelve-month research internship with a faculty mentor in a field relevant to the individual student’s career interests. The fellows will also receive additional training and support to help them to prepare competitive dossiers for graduate-school admission.

To learn more about IPREP and eligibility information, go to http://iprep.iupui.edu/.

 

TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH IMPACT

JAMA Internal Medicine commentary: 'Improving Prescribing for Patients Late in Life'

Greg Sachs, M.D.

Greg Sachs, M.D.

Older adults are typically prescribed a large number of medications, often including drugs that should not be taken by individuals late in life. In a commentary published online by JAMA Internal Medicine on September 8, Regenstrief Institute investigator Greg Sachs, M.D., calls for physicians to carefully review older patients' medication lists.

According to Dr. Sachs, current prescribing guidelines fail to adequately address instances in which specific drugs are not beneficial or may even be harmful to older adults. Current guidelines also fail to identify age-adjusted standards for dosages and fail to address use, drug interactions and metabolism concerns. Dr. Sachs, professor of medicine and director of the Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine, and colleagues have proposed a model for prescribing medications that additionally incorporates a patient's anticipated life expectancy, the treatment target, the time needed for medication to produce its intended benefit and the patient's goals of care.

"Caring for older patients with their multiple health problems is problematic," said Dr. Sachs, a geriatrician. "Doctors, who only have limited time with each person they see, tend to reach for prescription pads or e-prescribing tools. Patients expect prescriptions and if they don't receive one will wonder what their doctor has done for them. As a result, the elderly receive too many prescriptions.

» Read more...

 

OVCR Internal Grant Deadlines

International Development Fund (IDF) GRANT:
The IDF grant was developed to enhance the international research and scholarly activity focus of the IUPUI academic mission. Generally, the IDF grant serves as venture capital to stimulate additional funding for international research and scholarly activity, which has strong potential to generate indirect cost recovery from extramural sources. The next IDF application deadline is November 15, 2014. For grant guidelines and application forms, go to http://research.iupui.edu/funding/.

 

OTHER INTERNAL GRANT DEADLINES

IU Vice President for Research Announces 2014-15 IU Collaborative Research Grants
Now in its 5th year, the IUCRG program supports collaborative research which will significantly advance a field and impact the lives of those in Indiana, the United States, and the world. The maximum funding per project will be $75,000.

Proposals must involve at least two faculty members from different departments, schools, campuses or disciplines, working on a new project with significant potential for external funding after the end of the IUCRG grant. Proposals are invited in three general areas:

I.   Social and Behavioral Sciences
II.  Biological, Natural or Health Sciences
III. Physical, Applied or Computer Sciences

The deadline for submission of proposals is December 3, 2014. Full program details are available online at http://research.iu.edu/funding_collaborative.shtml.

If you have questions about the program, please consult the FAQs on line. If you have questions not answered there, please contact IUCRG@iu.edu.  
 

OVCR Events and Workshops

Nine Golden Rules to Succeed in Research and Scholarship

Target Audience: Faculty

When: Friday, October 31, 2014 | 11:00am - 1:00pm
Where: University Library, Room 1126

This session will reveal the Nine Golden Rules on how to succeed in research and scholarship. It is focused toward new and early career investigators; however, mid career faculty should find information of interest as well.

Register: https://crm.iu.edu/CRMEvents/NineGoldenRules103114/

Ins and Outs of Applying for NIH Funding

Target Audience: Faculty and grant administrators

When: Friday, November 7, 2014 | 9:00am - 12:00pm
Where: University Library, Lilly Auditorium

How to prepare and submit grant proposals to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the focus of presentations by representatives of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, the Office of Research Administration, and NIH awardees on the IUPUI faculty. The workshop will provide an overview of the Institutes, their mission, priorities, and NIH programs that cut across disciplines. Specific topics include a description of the various funding mechanisms and their appropriateness for each career stage, attributes of high-quality proposals, and resources available within the University to support proposal development. Highlighting the event is a panel discussion by current NIH reviewers who will provide an in-depth look into the peer review process.

Register: https://crm.iu.edu/CRMEvents/NIHFunding110714/

Developing Complex, Multi-Investigator, Multi-Institutional Proposals

Target Audience: Senior Faculty with Previous External Funding

When: Thursday, November 13, 2014 | 11:30am - 1:00pm
Where: University Library, Room 1126

The current funding environment favors large, complex, multi-institutional, multi-investigator projects. However, organizing a successful submission takes a great deal of planning and teamwork. What works best in which situation? Should you use a “Red Team Review”? What role does the RFP serve to organize the writing efforts? Professional proposal writers and editors will discuss these and a number of related issues at this session. You are welcome to bring your lunch.

Register: https://crm.iu.edu/CRMEvents/ComplexProposals111314/

 

Other Events and Workshops

NIH Announces Webinars on Application Submission and Review Processes

The NIH Center for Scientific Review (CSR) will host four Meet the Experts in NIH Peer Review Webinars in early November 2014 to give new NIH grant applicants and others useful insights into the submission and peer review processes. CSR is the portal for NIH grant applications and their review for scientific and technical merit.

For information, go to http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-15-002.html.

Urgent Conversation on Ebola

The Hall Center for Law and Health, the IU Center for Bioethics, the IU School of Nursing and the IU Fairbanks School of Public Health are sponsoring

Ebola:  “Over There”…Now “Over Here” -- An Urgent Conversation About Ethics, Law, Public Health, and Practice”

Led by experts from these four sponsoring organizations, the conversation will occur on October 24, 2014, Room 375, IU McKinney School of Law from 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm. 

Admission is free of charge. Light refreshments will be available.

Proven or Approved Stem Cell Therapies: That is the Question

Speaker: Bianca Buechner, Ph.D., LL.M.
Thursday, October 23, 2014
12:00PM-1:00 PM
HITS Building, Room 3139

New ethical and regulatory challenges emerge as scientists struggle to turn biological knowledge into stem cell-based regenerative medicine. However, how do science and regulators interact? Especially when it comes to the use of the term “unproven therapies,” the literature seems to be ambiguous, if not misleading. Thus it is deemed to be necessary to examine and clarify the meaning of scientifically unproven stem cell therapies vs. an approved therapeutic by regulators, if they can be seen as separate at all, in the European legal and ethical context to foster sound science. In order to do so, it has to be clarified why stem cell therapies are or are meant to be treated differently than chemical drugs or other biologics. Cardiac stem cell therapies and trials and the Stamina Case will be used as case study.

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (IAHI) Fall 2014 Lineup

For more details and to register, visit http://www.iupui.edu/~iahi/?page_id=39.

 

RECENT EXTERNAL FUNDING AWARDS

The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research recognizes and congratulates all IUPUI faculty and researchers for recent awards they have received and that help to advance the IUPUI research enterprise. The following table highlights those receiving $100,000 or more in external grants.

Grants and Awards – July 2014

PI

Agency

Project Title

School

Department

Total

Serezani, Henrique

NATIONAL HEART, LUNG AND BLOOD INSTITUTE

Phosphatase and tensin homolog PTEN actions in polymicrobial sepsis

 MEDICINE 

MICROBIOLOGY & IMMUNOLOGY

 $1,950,000 

Johnson, Raymond M

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ALLERGY & INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Role of Plac8 in natural and vaccine-generated immunity against Chlamydia infections

MEDICINE

INFECTIOUS DISEASES

$1,691,445

Broxmeyer, Hal E

NATIONAL HEART, LUNG AND BLOOD INSTITUTE

Mechanisms of Synergistic Regulation of Stem/Progenitors

MEDICINE

MICROBIOLOGY & IMMUNOLOGY

Thurmond, Debbie C

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES, DIGESTIVE & KIDNEY

Regulating SNARE mechanisms to remediate glucose homeostasis

MEDICINE

PED-ENDOCRINOLOGY BASIC RES

$1,344,836

Were, Martin Chieng

CDC FOUNDATION

Rapid Baseline Situational Assessments for Improving Data for Decision-Making in Global Cervical Cancer Programs

MEDICINE

GENERAL INTERNAL MEDICINE

$749,982

Wilkes, David S.

THE ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION

Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program (AMFDP)

MEDICINE

DEAN MED-RESEARCH SUPPORT

$745,525

Ebright, Patricia R.

HEALTH RESOURCES AND SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

Advanced Education Nursing Traineeships

NURSING

NURSING

$697,286

Paczesny, Sophie

LEUKEMIA AND LYMPHOMA SOCIETY

Translating novel drug-targetable biomarkers to treat graft-versus-host disease

MEDICINE

PED-CLINICAL TRANSLAT RESEARCH

$550,000

Kassab, Ghassan S

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Coronary Blood Flow: Integrated Theory and Experiments

E&T

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

$288,917

Champion, Victoria L

WALTHER CANCER FOUNDATION, INC.

The BCOG Center for Symptom Management

NURSING

NURSING

$262,115

Eadon, Michael T

PHRMA FOUNDATION

Genetic Susceptibility to Nephrotoxicity.

MEDICINE

NEPHROLOGY

$240,000

Lannoo, Michael J

INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

Determining Survivorship in Wild-bred, Captive-raised Crawfish Frogs

MEDICINE

IUSM-TERRE HAUTE

$203,398

Xu, Xiao-Ming

VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY

Tissue engineering for remyelination after spinal cord injury

MEDICINE

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY

$171,390

Plawecki, Martin Henry

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE MEDICAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION

Alcohol Exposure Rate Control

MEDICINE

PSYCHIATRY

$150,000

Kusmierczyk, Andrew

AMERICAN HEART ASSOC-GREATER MIDWEST AFFILIATE

The role of localization in proteasome assembly

SCIENCE

BIOLOGY

$143,000

Xu, Zao Cheng

AMERICAN HEART ASSOC-GREATER MIDWEST AFFILIATE

PKC regulation of potassium current after ischemia

MEDICINE

ANATOMY & CELL BIOLOGY

$143,000

Foroud, Tatiana M

SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY RESEARCH FOUNDATION

3D Facial Imaging in FASD - Developmental Project

MEDICINE

MEDICAL & MOLECULAR GENETICS

$128,694

Boulton, Michael E

RESEARCH TO PREVENT BLINDNESS

Unrestricted / Challenge grant

MEDICINE

OPHTHALMOLOGY

$115,000

Torke, Alexia Mary

THE GREENWALL FOUNDATION

What do surrogate decision makers mean by goals of care for seriously ill older adults?

MEDICINE

GENERAL INTERNAL MEDICINE

$111,606

Yoshida, Ken

ANALOG COMPUTING SOLUTIONS

Extended Analog Computer Development as a Digitally Configurable, High Speed, High Order, and Low Power Analog Matched Filter

E&T

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

$104,961

Racette, Lyne

BRIGHTFOCUS FOUNDATION

An individualized model to monitor glaucoma progression

MEDICINE

OPHTHALMOLOGY

$100,000

Grants and Awards – August 2014

PI

Agency

Project Title

School

Department

Total

Hirsh, Adam Todd

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON MINORITY HEALTH AND HEALTH DISPARITIES

Virtual Perspective-Taking to Reduce Race and SES Disparities in Pain Care

SCIENCE

PSYCHOLOGY

$1,839,221

Molleston, Jean P

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES, DIGESTIVE & KIDNEY

Continuation of ChiLDReN, the Childhood Liver Disease Research Network--Indiana University

 MEDICINE 

PED-GASTROINTESTINAL DISEASES

 $1,600,335 

Conway, Simon J

NATIONAL HEART, LUNG AND BLOOD INSTITUTE

Molecular Mechanisms of Neural Crest-Related Heart Defects

MEDICINE

PED-NEONATAL BASIC RESEARCH

$1,560,000

Blum, Janice S.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ALLERGY & INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Immunology and Infectious Diseases

MEDICINE

MICROBIOLOGY & IMMUNOLOGY

$1,432,382

Liu, Yan

ST. BALDRICK'S FOUNDATION

Targeting PRL2 phosphatase in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

MEDICINE

PED-NEONATAL BASIC RESEARCH

$330,000

Rohr-Kirchgraber, Theresa M

INDIANA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

IU National Center of Excellence in Women's Health "Making Healthy Choices" Project RESPECT

MEDICINE

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY

$225,267

Pierce, Barbara J

UNIVERSITY OF ALBANY-SUNY

National Child Welfare Workforce Institute (NCWWI) Child Welfare Practice

SOCIAL WORK

SOCIAL WORK

$147,000

Saykin, Andrew J

INDIANA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Indiana TBI Genetics, Biomarker and Imaging Neurorepository

MEDICINE

RADIOLOGY & IMAGING SCIENCES

$120,000

Chen, Jinhui

INDIANA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

TBI reshapes neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus

MEDICINE

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY

$120,000

White, Fletcher A

INDIANA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HMGB1-RAGE Inflammatory Pathway in Traumatic Brain Injury-induced Cerebral Edema

MEDICINE

ANESTHESIA

$120,000

Clapp, D Wade

FOX CHASE CANCER CENTER

Testing the pharmacologic and genetic role of P21 activated kinase inhibition on Schwannoma formation using a novel genetically engineered murine model that closely phenocopies human NF2 disease

MEDICINE

PED-CHAIRMAN'S OFFICE

$116,797

Grants and Awards – September 2014

PI

Agency

Project Title

School

Department

Total

Loehrer, Patrick J.

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE

Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center Support Grant

 MEDICINE 

CANCER CENTER

 $6,239,172 

Flockhart, David A

NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE

Embedding Pharmacogenotyping in an Integrated Health System for the Underserved

MEDICINE

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

$3,624,956

Hibbard, Roberta A

INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF CHILD SERVICES

PEDS Cases (Pediatric Evaluations and Diagnostic Services)

MEDICINE

PED-CHILD PROTECTION PROGRAM

$3,120,000

Unverzagt, Frederick W.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING

Cognitive and Aerobic Resilience for the Brain

MEDICINE

PSYCHIATRY

$3,120,000

Yokota, Hiroki

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ARTHRITIS MUSCULOSKELETAL SKIN

Mechanical Loading and Bone

E&T

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

$1,716,000

Travers, Jeffrey B.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING

Wounding therapy and photocarcinogenesis

MEDICINE

DERMATOLOGY

$1,599,000

Li, Lang

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES

A Translational Bioinformatics Approach in the Drug Interaction Research

MEDICINE

MEDICAL & MOLECULAR GENETICS

$1,583,884

Derbigny, Wilbert A

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ALLERGY & INFECTIOUS DISEASES

The role of TLR3 signaling in Chlamydia caused urogenital pathology

MEDICINE

MICROBIOLOGY & IMMUNOLOGY

$1,540,364

Chalasani, Naga P.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES, DIGESTIVE & KIDNEY

Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN) a?? IU Clinical Center

MEDICINE

GASTROENTEROLOGY

$1,063,837

Moe, Sharon M.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES, DIGESTIVE & KIDNEY

Genetic risks for cardiovascular events in ESRD patients from the EVOLVE study

MEDICINE

NEPHROLOGY

$1,035,488

Haas, David M

RTI INTERNATIONAL

Pregnancy as a Window to Future Cardiovascular Health

MEDICINE

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY

$312,039

O'Neil, Joseph

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

The Spina Bifida Patient Registry Project at Riley Hospital for Children-Component B

MEDICINE

PED-DEVELOPMENTAL PEDIATRICS

$297,200

Tovar, Andres

WALMART FOUNDATION

Optimal plastic injection molding tooling design and production through advanced additive manufacturing

E&T

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

$291,202

Jin, Xiaoming

CITIZENS UNITED FOR RESEARCH IN EPILEPSY

Targeting High Mobility Group Box-1 signaling for preventing posttraumatic epileptogenesis

MEDICINE

ANATOMY & CELL BIOLOGY

$250,000

Reising, Deanna L.

JOSIAH MACY, JR. FOUNDATION

Educational Innovation: Scalable Models of Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (IPCP) Affecting Patient Outcomes

NURSING

NURSING

$220,232

McAllister, Thomas W

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE

Effect of Biomechanical Force Exposure on Cognition and Brain Activation in TBI

MEDICINE

PSYCHIATRY

$177,853

Lawrance, Mark

CUMMINS ENGINE FOUNDATION

Policy Choices for Indiana's Future: Thriving Communities, Thriving State.

SPEA

PUBLIC & ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS

$150,000

Chien, Stanley Yung-Ping

NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

TASI Mannequin

E&T

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGR

$150,000

Kacena, Melissa Ann

U.S. ARMY RESEARCH OFFICE

Effects of Spaceflight and Novel Treatments on Bone Regeneration - In Vitro Studies

MEDICINE

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

$145,015

Yokota, Hiroki

INDIANA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Novel treatment of spinal cord injury-induced osteoporosis

E&T

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

$120,000

Liu, Naikui

INDIANA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Activation of cPLA2 and mitochondrial dysfunction in spinal cord injury

MEDICINE

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY

$120,000

Lin, Chien-Chi

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE

Preparation and characterization of SF-PEG hydrogel sheet for tissue engineering

E&T

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

$120,000

Kaplan, Mark H

UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME

Engineering Heterobivalent Inhibitors for Specific Inhibition of Mast Cell Degranulation

MEDICINE

PED-PULMONARY BASIC RESEARCH

$104,625

Einterz, Robert Michael

ABBVIE FOUNDATION

Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) 2014

MEDICINE

GENERAL INTERNAL MEDICINE

$100,000

 

CURRENT EXTERNAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

Funding opportunities in this section include selected current grant announcements from federal agencies for new initiatives and changes to existing programs. Announcements with limited scope are not listed here but instead are sent directly to IUPUI School Deans.  For comprehensive coverage of funding opportunities, please use the online search tools listed below.

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP):  Through this competition, the DoD intends to award approximately $46 million for FY 2015, subject to the availability of funds. These funds will be awarded via grants made by the administering agencies. Grants will be for the purchase of research equipment costing $50,000 or more, which typically cannot be purchased within the budgets of single-investigator awards. With few exceptions (see section III.4.b.ii), an individual award may not exceed $1,500,000 in DoD funding. In FY 2014, 149 awards totaling $40 million were made. They ranged from approximately $50,000 to $1,102,000, averaging $267,824. Deadline: November 17, 2014. http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=266429

Multidisciplinary Research Program of the University Research Initiative: Quantum Optomechanics: The main qubit systems of interest in present quantum information science are photons, trapped ions and atoms, superconducting qubits, solid-state qubits such as spin and defect systems, and nanomechanical oscillators. The objective of this topic is to further exploit the intrinsically quantum behavior of nanomechanical systems, either by: integrating them with other proven systems, such as those named above, to demonstrate new or improved quantum logic operations; or by beating the limits of current techniques in precision measurements relevant to sensing, e.g. by creation of non-classical states of mechanical motion to increase the precision of position measurements; or by transformational improvements in experimental tests of foundational quantum mechanics of macroscopic systems, which could discriminate between different theories of the origins of decoherence and so improve our understanding of the macroscopic limits to implementation of quantum logic.

The program objectives necessarily require expertise drawn from the two DoD priority themes of quantum information and control and nanoscience and nanoengineering. It is probable that the most competitive proposals will engage frontier expertise in both the fabrication and control of nanomechanical systems and an area of applied quantum information science similar to those named above. Research projects funded by this vehicle are not expected to result in the development of any specific fieldable device, but demonstration of laboratory capabilities that could be extended to DoD missions are particularly encouraged. Deadlines: White paper: November 24, 2014; Proposal: February 23, 2015. http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=266208


NOTE: All faculty, researchers, and scientists on continuing contracts at IU interested in applying for Department of Defense funding are eligible for assistance by the consulting firm Cornerstone Government Affairs, arranged by the Vice President for Research.  Those interested in securing assistance from Cornerstone must submit a two-page summary of their research project and a CV or bio sketch to the VP for Research Office at vpr@iu.edu . Prior to submission, the IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research is offering preparation assistance with the two-page summaries. For more information, contact Ann Kratz, akratz@iupui.edu.

 

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections (SCHC): Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections (SCHC) helps cultural institutions meet the complex challenge of preserving large and diverse holdings of humanities materials for future generations by supporting preventive conservation measures that mitigate deterioration and prolong the useful life of collections.

SCHC offers two kinds of awards: 1. PLANNING−To help an institution develop and assess preventive conservation strategies, grants will support planning projects, which may encompass such activities as site visits, risk assessments, planning sessions, monitoring, testing, modeling, project-specific research, and preliminary designs for implementation projects. Planning grants must focus on exploring sustainable preventive conservation strategies. 2. IMPLEMENTATION−Projects should be based on planning that has been specific to the needs of the institution and its collections within the context of its local environment. It is not necessary to receive an NEH planning grant to be eligible for an implementation grant. Planning could be supported by NEH, other federal agencies, private foundations, or an institution's internal funds. Projects that seek to implement preventive conservation measures in sustainable ways are especially encouraged. Deadline: December 3, 2014. http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/sustaining-cultural-heritage-collections

Digital Projects for the Public: NEH's Division of Public Programs supports activities that engage millions of Americans in understanding significant humanities works and ideas. At the center of every NEH-funded public humanities project is a core set of humanities ideas developed by scholars, matched to imaginative formats that bring humanities ideas alive for people of all ages and all walks of life. The Digital Projects for the Public program supports projects such as websites, mobile applications, games, and virtual environments that significantly contribute to the public's engagement with humanities ideas. Projects must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship in a discipline such as history, religion, anthropology, jurisprudence, or art history. Digital Projects for the Public grants support projects that are largely created for digital platforms. While these projects can take many forms, shapes, and sizes, you should apply to this program primarily to create digital projects or the digital components of a larger project. NEH is a national funding agency, so these projects should demonstrate the potential to attract a broad, general audience. Projects can have specific targeted audiences (including K-12 students), but they should also strive to cultivate a more inclusive audience. Deadline: June 11, 2015. http://www.neh.gov/grants/public/digital-projects-the-public

 

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

Chronic Inflammation and Age-Related Disease: Chronic inflammation, as defined by elevated levels of both local and systemic cytokines and other pro-inflammatory factors, is a hallmark of aging in virtually all higher animals including humans and is recognized as a major risk factor for developing age-associated diseases. The spectra of phenotypes capable of generating low-level chronic inflammation and their defining mediators are not clear. Further, a clear understanding of how chronic inflammation compromises the integrity of cells or tissues leading to disease progression is lacking. The role of dietary supplements and/or nutritional status in chronic inflammation in age-related disease is also poorly studied. Thus, there is a critical need to establish the knowledge base that will allow a better understanding of the complex interplay between inflammation and age-related diseases. Applications submitted to this FOA should aim to clarify the molecular and cellular basis for the increase in circulating inflammatory factors with aging, and/or shed light on the cause-effect relationship between inflammation and disease, using pre-clinical (animal or cellular based) models. Deadline: September 07, 2015. http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-13-233.html

Morris K. Udall Centers of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease Research (P50): The overarching goal of the specialized Udall Centers program is to establish a network of Centers that work collaboratively as well as independently to define the causes of and discover improved treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD). A more immediate goal for each Center is to rapidly advance synergistic, interdisciplinary research programs while serving as local resources and national leaders in PD research. The overall theme, proposed research projects, and associated cores must inform the etiology, pathogenesis or treatment of PD. Investigations on related synucleinopathies may be included, to the extent that these directly inform PD research. Required components include: 1) a minimum of three research projects; 2) research cores that are essential to accomplish the aims of proposed research projects, plus an Administrative Core; and 3) a specific plan for training of PD researchers. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Udall Centers program prioritizes innovative and integrative research with significant potential for discovery. A considerable degree of synergy must be evident among Center research projects and cores, such that successful completion of the aims could not be accomplished without the Center structure. The Udall Center Director (PD/PI) must be an established leader in scientific research with visionary leadership skills and proven expertise in research project and personnel management. Eligible institutions must demonstrate commitment to and support for the establishment and continuation of the proposed Udall Center. Funding decisions will focus on those applications most likely to make innovative contributions to PD research, as well as those with greatest potential to contribute new ideas to and collaborate effectively across the Centers program. Deadlines: Letter of Intent: May 30, 2015; Submission: June 30, 2015. http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-14-003.html

Type 1 Diabetes Complications IMPACT Award (DP3): The goal of this initiative is to support creative research projects that address major obstacles to development and testing of new therapeutic approaches for T1D complications. This Funding Opportunity Announcement ( FOA) solicits research focused on defining biomarkers that can be used to track the onset, progression, and extent of tissue damage that develops over time in people with T1D. It also solicits research to develop approaches to regenerate damaged tissue. Proposed studies should be designed to address major unmet needs and/or compelling opportunities that have the potential to dramatically advance the field. Deadlines: Letter of Intent: February 19, 2015; Submission: March 19, 2015. http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-14-017.html

 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

Hydrologic Sciences: The Hydrologic Sciences Program focuses on the fluxes of water in the environment that constitute the water cycle as well as the mass and energy transport function of the water cycle in the environment. The Program supports studying processes from rainfall to runoff to infiltration and streamflow; evaporation and transpiration; as well as the flow of water in soils and aquifers and the transport of suspended, dissolved and colloidal components. Water is seen as the mode of coupling among various components of the environment and emphasis is placed on how the coupling is enabled by the water cycle and how it functions as a process. The Hydrologic Sciences Program retains a strong focus on linking the fluxes of water and the components carried by water across the boundaries between various interacting components of the terrestrial system and the mechanisms by which these fluxes co-organize over a variety of timescales and/or alter the fundamentals of the interacting components. The Program is also interested in how water interacts with the solid phase, the landscape and the ecosystem, as well as how such interactions and couplings are altered by land use and climate change. Studies may address aqueous geochemistry and solid phase interactions as well as physical, chemical, and biological processes as coupled to water transport. Deadline: December 05, 2014. http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13684

Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE): This program invites proposals that address immediate challenges and opportunities that are facing undergraduate STEM education, as well as those that anticipate new structures (e.g., organizational changes, new methods for certification or credentialing, course re-conception, cyberlearning, etc.) and new functions of the undergraduate learning and teaching enterprise. The IUSE program recognizes and respects the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice and work with education research colleagues and social science learning scholars to advance our understanding of effective teaching and learning.

Toward these ends the program features two tracks: (1) Engaged Student Learning and (2) Institutional and Community Transformation. Two tiers of projects exist within each track: (i) Exploration and (ii) Design and Development. These tracks will entertain research studies in all areas. In addition, IUSE also offers support for a variety of focused innovative projects that seek to identify future opportunities and challenges facing the undergraduate STEM education enterprise. The research and development of innovative tools, resources, and models for undergraduate STEM education that IUSE supports are expected to be both knowledge-based and knowledge-generating. They may be smaller Exploration or larger Design and Development projects. Research studies, workshops, and special projects are also encouraged. Deadline: January 13, 2015. http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505073&org=NSF&sel_org=NSF&from=fund

Research Training Groups in the Mathematical Sciences (RTG):  
The RTG program supports efforts to improve research training by involving undergraduate students, graduate students, postdoctoral associates, and faculty members in structured research groups anchored by a common research theme. The activities need not be focused on a particular research problem; rather, it is expected that group participants will be united by common topical interests. The groups may include researchers and students from different departments and institutions, but the research-based training and education activities must be based in the mathematical sciences. RTG projects are expected to vary in size, scope, and proposed activities, as well as in their plans for organization, participation, and operation. However, research groups supported by RTG will include vertically-integrated activities that span the entire spectrum of educational levels from undergraduates through postdoctoral associates.

Addressing all stages (from undergraduate through postdoctoral) of trainee involvement is essential in RTG proposals. Proposals that focus on only one stage are not appropriate for submission to the RTG activity. While emphasis on graduate training in RTG projects is appropriate and natural, a substantial plan for involving undergraduates is necessary. When used in reference to undergraduates, the word "research" should be given its broadest interpretation.

Successful proposals will include collaborating faculty with a history of research accomplishments. This group should have a history of working with students and/or postdoctoral investigators, and they should present a strong plan for recruiting students who are U.S. citizens, nationals, or permanent residents into their program. The RTG program is not meant to establish new research groups, but to enhance the training activities of existing groups with strong research records. Deadline: June 02, 2015. http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5732

 

Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

Pragmatic Clinical Studies and Large Simple Trials to Evaluate Patitient-Centered Outcomes:  This opportunity seeks to fund pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs), large simple trials (LSTs), or large-scale observational studies that compare two or more alternatives for addressing prevention, diagnosis, treatment, or management of a disease or symptom; improving health care system-level approaches to managing care; or for eliminating health or healthcare disparities. Proposed studies must address critical clinical choices faced by patients, their caregivers, clinicians, and/or delivery systems. They must involve broadly representative patient populations and be large enough to provide precise estimates of hypothesized effectiveness differences and to support evaluation of potential differences in treatment effectiveness in patient subgroups.

PCORI expects that most awards will be made for study designs that use randomization, either of individual participants or clusters, to avoid confounding bias. However, PCORI recognizes that exceptional opportunities may arise, by virtue of natural experiments and/or the existence of large registries, to address pragmatic questions using observational designs. Deadlines: Letter of Intent: March 10, 2015; Submission: August 08, 2015. http://www.pcori.org/funding-opportunities/funding-announcements/pragmatic-clinical-studies-and-large-simple-trials-to-evaluate-patient-centered-outcomes/
 

IDENTIFYING FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

On-line search tools are available to IUPUI investigators who are interested in identifying funding opportunities in their areas of interest.

Community of Science (COS): COS is a primary on-line search tool for identifying funding opportunities. To take advantage of this tool, register at http://www.cos.com/login/join.shtml. Once you have completed the short registration process, you can personalize your search by selecting the option entitled “launch your workbench”. You can access federal, local, corporate, foundation, nonprofit and other funding opportunities using key terms and save the results of up to 20 searches and have them delivered to you weekly via email.

National Institutes of Health (NIH) “NIH Guide”: To take advantage of this search tool, register at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/listserv.htm. It allows you to receive discipline specific funding opportunities that are delivered to you weekly via email.

National Science Foundation (NSF) “MyNSF”:To take advantage of this search tool, register at http://service.govdelivery.com/service/multi_subscribe.html?
code=USNSF&custom_id=823
. It allows you to receive discipline specific funding opportunities that are delivered to you weekly via email.

Federal Business Opportunities “FedBizOpps”: FedBizOpps is the single government point-of-entry for Federal government procurement opportunities over $25,000. To take advantage of this search tool, visit https://www.fbo.gov. Opportunities found at this site include, but are not limited to, presolicitations and special notices for research and service contracts for specific projects and some national centers and surveys that would not be found in Grants.gov and may not be found in the Community of Science.

Limited Submission Funding Opportunities:

Many federal agencies and foundations offer grants, awards and fellowships that limit the number of applications that can come from one institution or require special handling. In order to comply with agency and foundation guidelines and increase the chances of Indiana University (IU) succeeding in such limited submissions and special handling opportunities, IU policies and procedures are in place and are utilized by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and other IU research offices to facilitate internal coordination and competitions.

Individuals interested in responding to limited submission opportunities must inform the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research about their intent to apply to a given limited submission opportunity, such that they can be included in the internal review and selection process. Failure to do so may disqualify individuals from consideration for submission to the funding opportunity.

Individuals interested in a limited submission opportunity or have any questions about the internal coordination process, contact Etta Ward at emward@iupui.edu or 317-278-8427. For a description of upcoming limited submission funding opportunities, as well as guidelines and application forms, go to: http://research.iu.edu/limited_sub.shtml. Please note that this is not a comprehensive list, and that any external funding opportunity that imposes any type of submission limitation is subject to the IU limited submission policy and procedures.

 

Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research - ovcr@iupui.edu
Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
755 West Michigan Street, UL1140, Indianapolis, IN 46202-2896
Phone: (317) 278-8427

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